The good news.

Nielsen ratings are [finally] changing.
The jury is out on whether or not including Twitter in their numbers will actually fill the gaps their polling methods leave, but the fact remains that Nielsen, in conjunction with Twitter, is in the process of implementing and testing that new system.

 

How does it work?

The twitter rating will register “affinity for a show.” Essentially, this tool analyzes the words in your tweet to determine if you are watching a show, and whether you are responding “positively” or “negatively.” In other words, whether you like or dislike it.  It also measures how you respond to the ads, and to product placement within a show. 

For example, if you tweet “Loving the #warehouse13 episode! Steve drives a sweet Prius!” that would be considered “positive affinity” for both the show and the advertiser. And that positive affinity is what advertisers want!

 

What does this mean for us?

It means we have a chance to influence how advertisers view the value of Warehouse 13 as a way to promote their product.

 

So what do I do?

If you already have a twitter account, excellent. If you don’t, get one. Then tweet about both the show and its advertisers during the LIVE BROADCAST on Syfy following these basic guidelines.

  1.  Keep the tone of your tweet positive.  The better the affinity, the better the numbers look for Warehouse 13. No matter what the product is – unless you have a personal objection to supporting that product – remember that company paid to advertise during Warehouse 13
  2. Use your words.  Whole words, not abbreviated text-speak, are more likely to get picked up and recognized by the system.

Pro Tip.

Toward the goal of making a twitter splash for Warehouse 13, we have developed a tool that will suggest a relevant tweet, and allow you to tweet it on your account with the click of a button.  This takes on the heavy lifting of coming up with appropriately positive messages about products you may not care about and allows you to help the show…even without watching the broadcast.